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The #1 App In 2017 For Timing The American Total Solar Eclipse!
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Version 2 of Solar Eclipse Timer worked great in South America for the 2019 Total Solar Eclipse!  I have had great reports from Chile and Argentina!
The English version and the Spanish version were both used successfully!
I played the app through a Bluetooth speaker at my observing position so the group we were observing with could follow the progress of the eclipse.
We had perfectly clear skies and a very mild temperature with no wind on eclipse day.

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It was beautiful to see the eclipse set into the mountains. The spacing between the images in this composite was determined by the Partial Phase Image Sequence Calculator (PPISC) in the app which does the clock time calculations.  This is the unaltered progression along the eclipstic.  The camera and the camera tripod were fixed in position. The only processing that was done was making the totality layer lighter so the mountains would show as a silhouette.

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I do not use an intervalometer for the spacing of the partial phase images because the time between C1 and C2 is very different than the time between C3 and C4 in a setting eclipse such as this one.  The PPISC in Solar Eclipse Timer does the math and delivers these times to you corrected for your position on the path.

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This is a cropped and stacked image of the sequence of Baily's Beads going into 2nd contact.

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This is a cropped and stacked image of the sequence of Baily's Beads coming out of 3rd contact.

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The inset image is the full solar disk through a filter at 2 minutes after first contact.  There were no sunspots on eclipse day.  It's unfortunate because sunspots can be used to help focus on the Sun.  When there are no sunspots you must focus on the limb of the Sun and this can be challenging and less accurate.  But the highly cropped image of the limb of the Sun just prior to 3rd contact shows that good focus was obtained as this images shows beautiful prominences and chromosphere.

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This is an unprocessed image of totality.  This was taken with a shutter speed of 1/6 second with an ISO setting of 200.  The telescope was working at f10 with a focal length of 905mm.  High Dynamic Range image processing will be coming.

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Our observing site witnessed an amazing decrease in temperature fo 26 degrees Fahrenheit.  There are some reasons for this observation.
Season:  This is a winter eclipse in South America. This eclipse was 11 days after the winter solstice, so the Sun is on a low ecliptic in the sky.
Time of Day:  This was a late afternoon eclipse with C1 being at 4:25 PM and Max eclipse at 5:40 PM and C4 being at 6:46 PM, but sunset was actually a few minutes prior to C4. So there was a lot of time for the ground to cool
Observation Site:  Our ground cover was medium brown colored dirt. There was no grass and no surrounding foliage.
Local Meteorology:  There was basically no humidity, this plateau at the base of the Andes is really dry. When we arrived to the site the was no local wind currents at all, it was almost perfectly still. However, during the partial phases we did noticed that a light breeze occurred.  I believe we had the perfect conditions to witness an "eclipse breeze" that is described by some eclipse chasers.  This breeze is thought to be due to the approaching and deepening penumbra and the cooler column of air.  At our site this breeze would have cause air mixing, pushing down warmer air that was at a higher level just above us, and mixing it with the ground level air that is cooling due to the decrease in solar energy.

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