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This is the Help File That is Part of the App on Your Mobile Device

Please also read the Frequenly Asked Questions. If after reading the Help File and the FAQ's you still have questions you can email me at foxwoodastronomy@gmail.com

Table Of Contents

Set Up Protocol For Eclipse Day
Quick Start Guide - Understanding Your Device In Advance Of An Eclipse
Quick Start Guide - Understanding The Solar Eclipse TimerTM App In Advance Of An Eclipse
Complete Help File

Set Up Protocol For Eclipse Day

- You have eye protection, solar glasses; and equipment protection, solar filters
- Device is fully charged
- Time to screen lock/sleep is properly set to a minimum of 3 to 5 minutes, or consider using the setting "Never" (if your device allows)
- System clock is correct
- Time Zone is set and correct for your Local Time. If using Universal Time, set system clock to UTC, GMT
- Volume is turned up
- Media Volume is turned up
- Find the Solar Eclipse TimerTM app in your list of apps and Allow All Notifications, with Android allow Ambient Display
- Turn OFF unnecessary background programs
- Display brightness is fixed at a medium low level, NOT Auto, NOT Adaptive
- Camera flash is set to OFF
- GPS location services are turned ON, high accuracy if available
- The contact times loaded by GPS make sense for your observing location (confirm time zone offset)
- Time Label display matches the system of time you are using
- You have written down the Partial Phase Image Sequence Calculator times
- Remember to Save Eclipse Data so you have a record of your local circumstances
- Plan to turn OFF phone calls and text messaging at 15 minutes before totality

Quick Start Guide
Understanding Your Device In Advance Of An Eclipse

The Following List Of Instructions Is for Android devices with a BACK Button!
NOTE: Exiting Solar Eclipse TimerTM using the Back Button with the Android operating system allows you to have three options:
YES - CLEAR LAST: This option clears the previously used coordinates and the previous UTC contact times and returns the fields to zeros.
NO: Returns to the opened app.
YES: Exits the app but the last set of coordinates and UTC contact times are remembered and will be present when the app is re-opened. These contact times can then be re-loaded into the timers (which will open with zeros).  (Use the Android system "X" in the top banner to close the app completely)

Power

Test your device and make sure it will accept a full charge. Remember to pack your charger when you travel.

Time Before Screen Lock/Sleep

Review and understand the process for changing the time until your screen (display) goes to lock/sleep. You have 2 choices for this:
1. You can choose a screen lock time of "Never", if your device has this option. Your device will stay on with Solar Eclipse TimerTM running in the foreground for the entire eclipse. A total solar eclipse from 1st Contact to 4th Contact can last 3 hours, so you have to make sure your battery will last for this amount of time. Conserve power by using a dimmer screen brightness. The benefit of using the "Never" lock/sleep setting is the ability to use the large time clock to execute your plan for a partial phase image sequence. If you have access to electrical power during the eclipse consider leaving your device plugged in with the time to screen lock/sleep set to "Never".
2. You can allow you device to go to screen lock/sleep to conserve power. I suggest a setting of 3 to 5 minutes before screen/sleep lock occurs. This setting works well with the app.
Solar Eclipse TimerTM will continue to run in the background if your device goes into a screen lock/sleep mode. The app has system level notifications which will alert you to re-open the app just prior to important eclipse events. The notifications will include a custom ring-tone, a spoken voice announcement and a banner on the screen. The app is designed to force the timer screen to stay in the foreground for totality. This functionality is described in more detail below in the Complete Help File.

System Clock

Confirm that the system clock in your device is displaying the correct local time. The app screens will disply all times in the 24 Hour format. Your device is probably set to automatically adjust for time zone changes. However, you should understand how to choose the correct Time Zone for your observing location. Observing an eclipse at the junction of two times zones can get confusing because the sensitivity of devices adjusting between the two time zones can be variable. Decide if you are going to use Local Time or Universal Time (UT, UTC, GMT) to observe the eclipse and understand how to make the system changes accordingly.

YOU MUST ABSOLUTELY UNDERSTAND YOUR TIME ZONE AND HOW IT RELATES TO YOUR CONTACT TIMES!

GPS Location Services

Review and understand the process for turning ON geolocation/GPS services in your device. Use the High Accuracy setting if available. Solar Eclipse TimerTM must have access to latitude and longitude coordinates for your location to use the function of automatically calculating and loading contact times. The first time you use any of the geolocation functions in Solar Eclipse TimerTM you may be prompted to "Allow" access to your location.

Display Brightness

Review and understand the process for adjusting your screen display brightness. You should NOT use Auto or Adaptive brightness controls. It will get much darker during totality and you DO NOT want your device sensing the darkness and changing your screen to full brightness. You want to see the screen during totality, but you do not want the brightness to be overwhelming. You should manually choose a screen brightness setting that is in the bottom third of the brightness scale on your device and leave it set there for the entire eclipse.

Display Sizes

Confirm that your Display Size and your Font Size are set to the default settings. This will assure that all of the text and buttons in the app fit the screen size as designed.

Notifications

Review and understand the process for turning ON and allowing notifications for apps. When opening the program, if you ever get a prompt asking you to "Allow Notifications" from Solar Eclipse TimerTM, you must select "Allow". Always turn ON any notification settings for the Solar Eclipse TimerTM app in your device.

In Display Settings turn ON Ambient display or Moto display

In Notification Settings, under the Solar Eclipse Timer app, turn ON Override Do Not Disturb

Even during screen lock, the app has system level notifications which will alert you to re-open the app just prior to important eclipse events. The notifications will include a custom ring-tone, a spoken voice announcement and a banner on the screen. This is why it is important to have these notification selections set to ON. This functionality is described in more detail below in the Help File.

Background Programs

Review and understand the process for turning OFF background programs to save power. You will want to turn off all unnecessary programs the day of the eclipse.

Camera Flash

Review and understand process for shutting OFF your camera flash. You must go into your camera settings and turn the flash to OFF. Do not leave it on the AUTO setting, use OFF. You DO NOT want to take flash photography during totality!

Calls and Text Messages

Review and understand process for stopping phone calls and text messages. You should prepare to NOT accept calls and texts during totality. We suggest you stop calls and texts 15 minutes before totality. Use the announcement "15 Minutes To Totality Observe Changes In Ambient Temperature" as a reminder to do this. From this point on you need to concentrate on the eclipse!

Quick Start Guide
Understanding The Solar Eclipse TimerTM App In Advance Of An Eclipse

Main Timer Screen - From Top to Bottom

Top Navigation Bar
The "Location" icon at the top right hand side of the app (next to the Information icon) takes you to the GPS Data screen. The app will automatically search for latitude and longitude coordinates and calculate a set of contact times. If C1, C2, C3 and C4 can be calculated, you are in the path of totality. You can tap the latitude and longitude coordinate lines to type in your own location values. Use the "Get My Location" button and the "Calculate Contact Times" button as needed for manual coordinate changes. All geolocation functions are controlled on this screen.

The "Information" icon at the top right hand corner of the app takes you to the About screen that page has basic information about the program, web links, contact information and copyright information.

A "Stop" icon will appear (replacing the Location icon) at the top right when either of the special demo sessions are loaded. Demo sessions are chosen on the Settings screen. This icon is used to end either of the demo sessions.

Top Timer
The top timer has a label that can be changed to read Local Time or Universal Time. This label is chosen on the Settings screen. This is just a label, it does not alter the device's actual system time. The time of day is displayed in the 24 hour format.

Totality Duration
This is a countdown timer of the totality duration. The time displayed here is automatically calculated based on the contact times entered for 2nd contact and 3rd contact. This timer will start to countdown when 2nd contact is reached.

Contact Times
The four contact times are displayed in 24 hour format. The times that are displayed are based on the time zone that your device is set to. The times displayed will be adjusted for local time by calculating the offset from universal time. The times displayed will be universal time if you have your device set to UTC or GMT.

Adjust Buttons
Tapping an "Adjust" button below the contact times opens a time picker that can be used to enter contact times manually or make adjustments to contact times that were automatically entered by the app.

Max Eclipse Time
The time displayed here is the mid-point or halfway point of totality. It is calculated based on the times entered for 2nd and 3rd contact. It is not adjustable.

Check Position Button
The "Check Position" button takes you back to the GPS Data screen where you can check your position by; viewing your latitude and longitude coordinates, viewing a generated physical address (if available) and reviewing your contact times in UTC format. This should not be the primary way to geolocate, you should use the Location Icon on the top banner. All geolocation functions are controlled on this screen.

Save Eclipse Data Button
The "Save Eclipse Data" button opens a New Eclipse Data sheet where you can create and save files with your eclipse local circumstances. There are a number of pre-named fields for entering information about an actual eclipse or information about site visits prior to the eclipse.

Bottom Tab Bar
The "Timer" tab at the bottom left hand corner of the app returns you to the main timer screen.
The "Eclipse Data" tab at the bottom of the app takes you the Eclipse Data screen where a list of previously saved eclipse data file names are displayed.
The "Settings" tab at the bottom of the app takes you to the Settings screen where many functions of Solar Eclipse TimerTM are available.
The "Help" tab at the bottom right hand corner takes you to the Complete Help File screen with extensive explanations about using Solar Eclipse TimerTM.

Solar Eclipse TimerTM - Screens

Timer Screen
The Timer Screen is the screen that you will have visible during an eclipse. This is where you will monitor the entire spectacular eclipse, including the clock time and your contact times. This screen will display scrolling statements as a visual aid to upcoming eclipse events. The countdown voice announcements will guide you to the contact times. The partial phase phenomena voice announcements will remind you to observe for these interesting phenomena. The screen image will change to show you a representation of the phases of the eclipse.

GPS Data Screen
The GPS Data Screen is where you do all of your geolocation modifications. On this screen you can view your latitude and longitude coordinates, view a generated physical address (if available) and review your contact times in UTC format. If you move your observing position you can use the "Get My Location" button to find the new location coordinates. The "Calculate Contact Times" button will calculate new times if the coordinates have changed. The latitude and longitude coordinates that are loaded by the device can be mofified. Tap to put the cursor to the right side of the numbers and backspace to remove them and then enter new values by using the keyboard.

The keyboard will continually disappear if the device is actively searching for new coordinates. You must wait for new coordinates to be generated or tap the Stop button. Coordinates can also be pasted into these lines by copying coordinates that you saved in your eclipse data files. The result of your contact time calculation will result in a message that informs you whether you are OUT of the path of totality or IN the path of totality.

If only 1st and 4th Contact can be calculated you are ONLY in a partial eclipse. You DO NOT get a button that allows you to load contact times into the timers.

If 4 contact times can be calculated, then you are in the path of totality, you are presented with an additional button, "Tap to Load Contact Times" that will load the contact times into the timer screen.

NOTE: The "Tap to Load Contact Times" button loads contact times that consider two things: 1. The Time Zone Offset from UTC. 2. The calendar date and whether it is Standard Time or Daylight Savings Time (Summer Time). If you are doing tests for an eclipse that is months into the future and it spans across the calendar date of a time change, you MUST adjust your device system calendar date to be in the same "time" as the eclipse your are testing for. If you do not do this adjustment at the system level the contact times will be off by an hour. This is due to the fact that the operating system calendars usually have the date of time changes pre-programmed for years into the future.

This is not an issue if you are going to use UTC for your system setting and time the eclipse in UTC.

Calendar date time changes (Daylight Savings Time) are NOT considered when entering times manually with the time pickers because you are not using the internal formulas to calculate the contact times. This always assumes the present day.

NOTE: If you are testing contact times in advance of the eclipse on the main timer screen during the day in the range of time when the actual eclipse will be occurring, Solar Eclipse TimerTM will think it is eclipse day and behave as such and play announcements. In this instance, if testing and geolocating during eclipse time, the Totality Duration will dipslay zeros between C3 and C4 even if you geolocate in this time period (it thinks totality is over). To be able to calculate and display your Totality Duration time, you have to geolocate before C3 or after C4.

NOTE: Due to the function of the Android Operating System, Solar Eclipse TimerTM will always re-open with the last set of 4 contact times that were successfully loaded. It will also have the last set of GPS coordinates on the GPS Data screen.

To clear all data and re-set to zeros use the Android Back button until you get to the Exit dialogue box and then exit by selecting the YES - CLEAR LAST option.

Eclipse Data Screen
The Eclipse Data Screen will show a list of files that you saved regarding eclipses or observation site visits. They are listed in the order they are saved from oldest to newest.

Edit Eclipse Data Screen
The Edit Eclipse Data Screen will appear when you open one of your previously saved files or when saving a new eclipse data file. Here you can enter and review relevant information about your Eclipse Local Circumstances. All fields can be modified. The "Save Eclipse Data" button from the timer screen will result in automatic entering of the date, physical address (if available), location coordinates, contact times, time label and totality duration.

Settings Screen
The Settings Screen is where all of the special features of Solar Eclipse TimerTM can be accessed. The Time Label selector and Mute Movie Sound selector are located here. Tapping either of these lines brings you to a screen where you can make selections regarding the time label and the movie sound. There are buttons that are labeled "Load Demo Contact Times", "Play a Practice Eclipse Movie", "Partial Phase Image Times", and "The Path of Totality". This screen has a basic description of the special features accessed by these buttons. More extensive explanations are located in the Complete Help File.

NOTE: When using the demo session "Load Demo Contact Times" an important button is added that you must be aware of, a "STOP" button appears in the top Navigation Bar on the right side of the screen. This "STOP" button will remove any pending app system notifications. If you are ever doing any timer testing for an eclipse and notifications are loaded in the background, these notifications will play even with the app closed if you do not use the "STOP" button first. If your device ever plays a notification when you have the app closed, you should open the app, load the first demo program and tap the "STOP" button. That will remove the remaining notifications.

Time Label Screen
The Time Label Screen is where you choose to display either Local Time or Universal Time on the timer screen.

Mute Movie Sound Screen
The Mute Movie Sound Screen is where you can choose to mute the audio track of the totality movie that plays with the Totality Practice Times demo session.

Partial Phase Images Screen
The Partial Phase Images Screen displays the clock times you would use to take a 10 image sequence of the partial phases before and after totality.

The Path of Totality Screen
The Path of Totality Screen has an image of the path across the country. It re-enforces that fact that you must get into the path of totality. It reminds you to use proper eye protection during the partial phases. It explains that Solar Eclipse TimerTM is not specifically designed to be a mapping app. It provides a choice of three hyperlinks that connect to the internet to view interactive maps of the path of totality. Solar Eclipse TimerTM is not responsible for data usage by your device or the availability of these links for eclipse planning before or on eclipse day.

Complete Help File

Top Of Screen
Inroduction
Operating Systems Supported
Audible Announcements and Warning Tones
Using GPS Geolocation and Loading Contact Times
Entering Contact Times Manually
Using Eclipse Data Saving Functions
Using Local Time or Universal Time
Using The Demo Contact Times Program
Using The Play a Practice Eclipse Movie Program
Using the Partial Phase Image Sequence Calculator
Path Of Totality Screen
Partial Phase Phenomena Education
About Screen
Legal
Introduction
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Thank you for your interest in Solar Eclipse TimerTM, the original "Talking Timer" program for total solar eclipses. It has been improved and re-programmed for the Apple operating system and the Android operating system.

Solar Eclipse TimerTM is clearly the "Crown Jewel" of solar eclipse guiding smart phone apps.

The original solar eclipse "talking timer" program was conceived and designed in 2001 and was programmed to run on Windows 98 and Windows Pocket PC. Windows Pocket PC was the operating system for the first Personal Digital Assistants (PDA's). This period of time was just prior to PDA's being morphed into the first generation of smart phones.

The inspiration for the development of this program was a wonderful journey to experience a Total Eclipse of the Sun in Africa on June 21, 2001. The event was spectacular to behold. And we, like most people, also wanted to photograph it.

We realized that, in addition to the photographic plan, one of the ingredients to successful eclipse photography is precise timing. Precise timing requires that you have the precise contact times for your observing location. But in reality, having the precise contact times is not enough. What would have really been helpful was having audible warnings, leading up to the contact times without having to look down at the small numbers on your watch, especially in the darkness of totality. This would help you be in position to execute your photographic plan. The celestial events at 2nd Contact and 3rd Contact occur quickly! The duration of totality is short! Every second is crucial, time cannot be wasted; it is a wonderful, exciting and high-pressure event!

We also realized that the majority of people at their first total solar eclipse miss the interesting partial phase phenomena that occur between 1st and 2nd contact when progressively more of the solar disk is obscured by the Moon. They don't exactly know what to observe for or when to observe these events. Or, with all of the excitement, they just forget to think about this fascinating aspect of total solar eclipses. So we added the important feature of audible announcements about these phenomena.

That is why we designed and developed the first "talking timer" for total solar eclipses in 2001 and used it successfully for our 2nd total solar eclipse in Africa on December 4, 2002. Additionally, for the December 2002 eclipse, the editor of Sky and Telescope Magazine, Richard Fienberg used our talking timer software to help him guide the eclipse chasers that were on the Sky and Telescope solar eclipse tour. And Sky and Telescope Magazine featured our product as one of the "Hot New Products For 2003."

Now we are excited to release it again as a smart phone app for Apple and Android. The concept is the same, a smart phone timing tool with voice reminders, voice countdowns and warning tones. It was developed to help eclipse chasers like you, both experienced and new, enjoy the eclipse by audibly announcing important events. Solar Eclipse TimerTM provides spoken voice warnings leading up to interesting partial phase phenomena. It provides spoken numeric countdowns to the contact times. Contact times and Max/Mid eclipse are also marked with warning tones. Solar Eclipse TimerTM allows you to precisely choreograph the list of photography chores you must accomplish prior to and during the contact times.

The complex nature of the smart phone operating systems and their processing power has allowed the addition of terrific new features. A Demo Contact Time session that automatically loads contact times for you so you can have the entire sequence of announcements played. A Demo Totality Practice Time session that automatically loads a 270 second movie of a total solar eclipse and matches it to the timer countdown announcements. A Partial Phase Image Times Sequence Calculator that automatically calculates the clock times you should use to take an equally spaced 10 image sequence of the partial phases before and after totality. A screen with hyperlinks to internet sites with interactive maps of the path of totality.

Operating Systems Supported
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Solar Eclipse Timer™ has been programmed for Apple (iOS 10 or greater) and Android operating systems (Android 4.4 or greater).

Other than some needs for geolocation, which may require a cellular data connection or searching for Wi-Fi hotspots (location assistance functions only) , this app runs completely locally on the device. It does not require an internet connection to function and it does not require communicating to other computer servers.

I am proud to say that I hired independent, US based, software engineers to program for me, for both the original Windows programs and the new smart phone apps.

Audible Announcements and Warning Tones
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Solar Eclipse TimerTM has spoken audible announcements. There are spoken countdowns to all the contact times and max eclipse. In addition, warning tones are played at the contact times and at max eclipse. This unique feature allows you to know exactly what is happening with the eclipse without having to refer to your watch or your device during crucial moments at the contact times. This is the concept of the "Talking Timer for Total Solar Eclipses".

A new feature for smart phones is announcements regarding the proper use of solar glasses. When you can take them off and when you must put them back on.

YOU MUST USE PROPER EYE PROTECTION BEFORE AND AFTER TOTALITY! This means proper eye protection during all of the partial phases of the eclipse!
During FULL totality IT IS SAFE to look at the corona without eye protection.

Solar Eclipse TimerTM assists you with this! It will make announcements regarding the use of solar glasses.

At 2nd Contact
It will play a 1 second warning tone and announce "glasses off, glasses off". It is now safe to remove your solar glasses and enjoy totality.

Just Before 3rd Contact
During the countdown to 3rd contact, it will play the 10 second warning statement and then announce "glasses on, glasses on!". It is now time to put your solar glasses on.

At 3rd Contact
It will play a 1 second warning tone and announce "glasses on, glasses on" again. You MUST have your solar glasses now! Totality is over!

The assistance for eclipse photography can be outlined like this:

"First Contact In 60 Seconds" - line up you camera and set the exposure for partial phase photography. At the tone take your image for the fun of documenting 1st contact. Then take all of your partial phase images as calculated by the partial phase image sequence calculator.
"Second Contact in 2 Minutes" - take your final partial phase crescent image and set you camera exposure settings for the diamond ring and Baley's beads.
"Second Contact in 60 Seconds, Observe for Shadow Bands" - enjoy the approach of darkness and get prepared to remove solar filters. Continue to use solar glasses for your eyes when looking at the thin sliver of the crescent.
"20 Seconds" - you should have your hands on your solar filters and pull them off within the next few seconds.
"10 Seconds" - just prior to this your solar filters should be off and you start taking rapid images for the diamond ring and Baley's beads.
"Tone For Second Contact" - You are in total eclipse! Glasses can come off. Take a good look with you eyes and then take a set of bracketed exposures of totality.
"Max Eclipse In 10 Seconds" - make sure you finish your photography by the max eclipse tone and enjoy the view with your eyes and binoculars or telescope.
"Observe The Horizon" - look all around you at the 360 degree colored horizon, take some pictures with another wide angle camera with the FLASH OFF.
"Third Contact in 20 Seconds" - change your camera exposure settings back to the settings for Baley's beads and the diamond ring.
"10 Seconds" - start taking rapid images for Baley's beads and the diamond ring. There is a reminder to put solar glasses on after this statement.
"Tone for Third Contact" - after the tone put your solar filters back on. There is a reminder to put solar glasses on after this statement. At this point you MUST have solar glasses ON to protect your eyes.
"Observe For Shadow Bands" - 30 seconds after third contact there is a reminder to look for shadow bands on the ground around you.
Now refer back to your partial phase image sequence list times and take an image 2 minutes after third contact and then complete the sequence.
"Fourth Contact in 60 Seconds" - prepare for the end of the eclipse and to take you final image.
"Tone For Fourth Contact" - take your final image.

Congratulations, you have successfully photographed an eclipse like a veteran eclipse chaser!

Using GPS Geolocation and Loading Contact Times
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One of the magical features of this app is the combination of geolocation with contact time calculation!

Your device must be set to allow access to its location. If this has never been enabled in your device the first time you try to use geolocation functions with Solar Eclipse TimerTM, your device will ask for permission to allow access to your location. You need to agree.

The GPS Data screen is where all of the geolocation data is viewed and manipulated. The GPS Data screen is accessed two ways: tapping the "Location" icon at the top right hand side of the app in the Navigation Bar or by tapping the "Check Position" button on the main timer screen.

Tapping the "Location" Icon will automatically search for your latitude and longitude location, load your coordinates (in decimal format) and display the physical location (if available). The app will also calculate contact times (in UTC) based on those coordinates. This should be the first method used to geolocate.

The "Get My Location" button will load new coordinates if your location has changed. It can be repeatedly tapped if you are moving and the coordinates will update. The Latitude and Longitude fields can be modified by tapping on the line and revising the value using the keyboard that will appear. The keyboard will not disappear if the app is actively searching for location coordinates.

The Calculate Contact Times button will calculate the contact times (in UTC) again if the location coordinates have been changed.

If you are OUT of the path of totality, only C1 and C4 can be calculated, because you are in a observing position which will only allow seeing a partial eclipse. The app will still calculate and display a mid-point time. You get a message that says *** YOU ARE NOT IN THE PATH OF TOTALITY*** .   NOcountdowns or announcements are played for a partial eclipse.
 
If you are in the path of totality, times for C1, C2, C3 and C4 will be calculated. The app will calculate and display the mid-point time. The contact times will be calculated in universal time. On the GPS Data screen the contact times are always displayed in universal time, because this serves as a good reference for you to check with the scientific published times. You get a message that says "GOOD OBSERVING POSITION / YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF TOTALITY and another function is now available. You now have a button that says "Tap to Load Contact Times" and when you tap this button you are taken to the timer screen where the contact times are loaded. Solar Eclipse TimerTM is now ready! It will be your personal guide through the entire eclipse! All of the recorded timing announcements will play based on the contact times. Even if this is your first eclipse, you will enjoy it like an expert eclipse chaser!

NOTE: The "Tap to Load Contact Times" button loads contact times that are adjusted for two things: 1. The Time Zone Offset from UTC. 2. The calendar date and whether it is Standard Time or Daylight Savings Time (Summer Time). If you are doing tests for an eclipse that is months in the future and it spans across the calendar date of a time change, you MUST adjust your system calendar to be in the same "time" as the eclipse your are testing for. If you do not do this system adjustment the contact times will be off by an hour. This is due to the fact that the Apple operating system calendar has the date of time changes pre-programmed for years into the future.

This is not an issue if you are going to use UTC for your system setting and time the eclipse in UTC.

Calendar date time changes are not considered when entering times manually with the time pickers. This always assumes the present calendar day.

In the Apple and Android operating systems, selecting, copying and pasting is supported in the Eclipse Data sheets. It is done by using the Tap and Hold technique over text until you get the options for selecting and copying. Go to where you want to paste and clear the line you want to paste to. Use the Tap and Hold technique until you get the option for pasting. So you can individually copy the saved latitude and the saved longitude from the Eclipse Data sheet and paste them into the appropriate line on the GPS Data screen.

If you can pre-plan your observing position it is a good idea to have a written copy of your latitude and longitude coordinates and your contact times. Or have them saved in your device in a Eclipse Data sheet.

NOTE: Geolocation systems in smart phones and cellular enabled tablets use a number of complex methods to find your location in addition to using GPS satellites. It is a mixture of Wi-Fi, Assisted GPS, Digital Compass and Cellular information. The goal is to provide the most accurate geolocation information as quickly as possible. Depending on your location some methods will require the use of cellular service and a small amount of data may be used. It would be very rare that your smart phone will use GPS satellite signals exclusively.

NOTE: Tablets that are Wi-Fi only will have difficulty geolocating in remote areas because they do not have access to cellular information and do not have GPS capability. You should always keep Wi-Fi enabled, even if you are not connected to a known network, because the tablets can geolocate by looking for other Wi-Fi hot spots in range for location purposes only. If your Wi-Fi only tablet is unable to geolocate you can overcome this limitation by using a smart phone as a hotspot.

NOTE: Be advised; if you are planning to observe an eclipse in a very remote location where there may not be cellular service, you should have a dedicated hand held GPS receiver to get you GPS coordinates. Another option, in an emergency, is the get GPS coordinates from your vehicle if it is equipped with navigation. Anyway you can get latitude and longitude coordinates will allow you to manually enter them into Solar Eclipse TimerTM and then calculate your contact times. The GPS coordinates must be in the decimal format.

NOTE: If coordinates are presented in the format of Degrees, Minutes and Seconds (DMD), you have to change them to the Decimal format (DD). The Minutes and Seconds have to be converted into a fraction of a degree and the formula you use is M/60 + S/3600. Example: 38d 53m 23s would convert to 38.8897d.

NOTE: Due to the function of the Android Operating System, Solar Eclipse TimerTM will always re-open with the last set of 4 contact times that were successfully loaded. It will also have the last set of GPS coordinates on the GPS Data screen. You can manually adjust the contact times for testing. You can manually adjust the coordinate values for testing.

To clear the last set of data repeatedly tap the Android Back button until you get to the exit dialogue box and then select YES - CLEAR LAST. 

NOTE: Everthing will update if you do a new geolocation.

Entering Contact Times Manually
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When you start the Solar Eclipse TimerTM app it opens to the Timer Screen with zeros entered into all of the contact times. There is not and On/Off function for Solar Eclipse TimerTM. When ever there are logical times loaded into the timers, that are in the future, the app is going to function and make announcements. You can use the "Adjust" buttons to enter contact times into the app manually. THE ONLY CONDITION IS THAT THE TIMES BE IN THE FUTURE RELATIVE TO THE CURRENT SYSTEM TIME.

For any contact time to function properly for a test, you need to enter a time that is AT LEAST 2 1/2 minutes into the future. This is because first, second and fourth contact begin with a notification of the event with a visual scrolling statement 2 minutes BEFORE the programmed time. Second contact has an audible announcement and a visual scrolling statement 2 minutes before the programmed time. Third contact has an audible announcement and a visual scrolling statement starting 20 seconds before the programmed time.

You can enter any contact times that are in the future and progressive. While you are testing, you can adjust any times that are in the future, as long as you keep the new adjusted time in the future. All visual statements, audible announcements and screen image changes update accordingly.

If you enter contact times that are very compressed, the app will only use visual statements, audible announcements and screen images that fit within that compressed time.

Partial phase phenomena announcements are only played between C1 and C2. They are NOT played during C3 and C4. However, the screen skin images do update between C3 and C4 showing the progression of the partial phases of the Sun.

NOTE: Calendar date time changes (Daylight Savings Time) are NOT considered when entering times manually with the time pickers because you are not using the internal formulas to calculate the contact times. This always assumes the present day.

NOTE: Solar Eclipse TimerTM will allow entering times that are not logical and not progressive, so you have to be careful and check your times carefully when entering times manually. Therefore, practice times that cross midnight cannot be logical to the timing program sequence.

NOTE: If you are testing contact times in advance of the eclipse on the main timer screen during the day in the range of time when the actual eclipse will be occurring, Solar Eclipse TimerTM wiil think it is eclipse day and behave as such and play announcements. In this instance, if testing and geolocating during eclipse time, the Totality Duration will display zeros between C3 and C4 even if you geolocate in this time period. To be able to calculate and display your Totality Duration time, you have to geolocate before C3 or after C4.

NOTE: The "Load Demo Contact Times" button on the Settings screen has an important feature that you must be aware of, it has a "STOP" button in the top Navigation Bar on the right side of the screen. This "STOP" button will remove any pending app system notifications. If you are ever doing any timer testing for an eclipse and notifications are loaded in the background, these notifications will play even with the app closed if you do not use the "STOP" button first. If your device ever plays a notification when you have the app closed, you should open the app, load the first demo program and tap the "STOP" button. That will remove the remaining notifications.

The "STOP" button availability was limited to the demo program screens and not available on the timer screen on purpose. Having it here prevents accidental removal of system notifications on eclipse day. Therefore, it is a two step process to remove system notifications.

Using Eclipse Data Saving Functions
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Solar Eclipse TimerTM has a file saving function that allows you to save useful data about your observing position and experience. This is very helpful to prepare for an eclipse because you can save useful information, including the local circumstances of potential observing sites. On the day of the eclipse, you can quickly save your local circumstances for your observing location.

Once you have your location coordinates, and your contact times are entered into the timers, you can tap the "Save Eclipse Data" button and you will be taken to a New Eclipse Data screen that can be filled out and saved as a file. Use the keyboard to type in a file name and close the keyboard. Scroll down and you will see that the app automatically saved the current date. It also entered your observing site's physical address based on the location coordinates. Note that the physical address identification is not always supported and the address may not be searchable. If so, the address fields will be blank, but you can manually type in your location using the keyboard. The app also saved the latitude and longitude for your observing position. Finally, it saved your contact times, the max eclipse time and the totality duration as well as your time label. All of this is done automatically for you!

There are other fields that you can enter data: Time Zone offset, lines for the names of 4 observers, country, distance off the centerline, elevation above sea level, Sun altitude at max eclipse, site description, temperature, sky conditions, and two additional sections to type other information and notes.

All of this information will be saved under the file name you gave it. To access all of your saved files, tap on the Eclipse Data tab on the bottom tab bar and a screen with a list of all your files, in the order that they were saved, will appear. Tapping on one of those files will open the data sheet so you can review the information and modify it if you need to.

The data sheet supports the Apple and Android operating system for selecting, copying, and pasting. Therefore, you can individually copy the latitude and longitude from previously saved eclipse data sheets and paste those coordinates into the proper fields on the GPS Data screen to re-calculated contact times. Be sure to erase the coordinate numbers in the fields of the GPS Data screen before pasting in the new coordinates that you copied.

Using Local Time or Universal Time
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Solar Eclipse TimerTM will display the current time in the 24-hour format.

You will find that most published scientific data regarding Local Circumstances for total solar eclipses will be published in Universal Time (UTC, GMT). All of the internet interactive eclipse path maps that I have found present the local circumstances in universal time. The NASA Eclipse Bulletins publish all data on the Local Circumstances in Universal Time. In preparation for the total solar eclipse you will need to decide which system of time you want to use.

If you decide to use Local Time, in the 24-Hour format, you will have to understand the time zone for your observing position. All time zones around the world are an offset from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). If your device is set to change time zones automatically it will adjust for the proper times zone. However, you should still understand how to set this in your device manually should that need occur. Solar Eclipse TimerTM displays the time, in the 24 hour format, in the time field. When your device is set to a local time zone, Solar Eclipse TimerTM considers that time zone when loading the contact times from the GPS Data screen when using the "Tap to Load Contact Times' button. It will make the adjustment for the offset from universal time and load the contact times correctly for your local time. The "Tap to Load Contact Times" button also considers the operating system calendar and will adjust automatically for Daylight Savings Time. Always make sure that the loaded contact times make sense for your observing location and is the appropriate offset from UTC.
YOU MUST ABSOLUTELY UNDERSTAND YOUR TIME ZONE AND HOW IT RELATES TO YOUR CONTACT TIMES!

If you are observing at the junction of time zone lines you must be careful because various devices can behave differently at these junctions (I have tested this issue personally). At these junctions you may have to change the time zone in your device manually. Be aware that for some eclipses in the future you may have to account for Daylight Savings Time for your observing location. Not all US states practice Daylight Savings Time. Not all countries practice Daylight Savings Time, therefore, you will have to do some research.

If you decide to use Universal Time (UTC) you need to set the time zone of your device to UTC, GMT (Greenwich Meridian Time). This is the time zone at Longitude zero (Time Zone Z). With this time zone setting the contact times that are loaded into the main timers will be the same as those calculated on the GPS Data screen. However, you still need to understand the offset from your local time zone so you set up for the eclipse at the appropriate time! You don't want to be an hour late!

Change the time display on the timer screen to the appropriate time label. This is done in the Settings screen by tapping the Time Label and selecting Local Time or Universal Time. Remember this does not change your device system time, this is only a label. This label will be saved as part of your Eclipse Data file.

NOTE: The August 21, 2017 Unites States total solar eclipse crosses all time zones. For this summer season eclipse (Daylight Savings Time) the time zone offsets are as follows;
For the Pacific Time Zone subtract 7 hours from UTC.
For the Mountain Time Zone subtract 6 hours from UTC.
For the Central Time Zone subtract 5 hours from UTC.
For the Eastern Time Zone subtract 4 hours from UTC.

Using the Demo Contact Times Session
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Accessed by a button located on the Settings screen, this is an exciting new feature that is possible due to the advanced computing power of the new devices.

You should take the time to use this demo program. If you have your device Screen Lock set to anything other than Never, you will see how Solar Eclipse TimerTM uses System Notifications to alert you to re-open the app. You will receive a custom ring tone, a voice announcement and a screen banner that you will have to swipe to get back to your home screen. It is important that you become familiar with this notification scheme so you do not miss important eclipse events.

Tapping the "Load Demo Contact Times" button loads a demo session into the timers that starts C1 at 3 minutes after the button is tapped. All 4 contact times are loaded but with C1 to C4, the entire eclipse, spanning 58 minutes. Totality, C2 to C3 spans 105 seconds. The demo session is finished 1 minute following C4. This allows you to hear all of the voice announcements in a compressed time of 61 minutes. You will then know what to expect the day of the eclipse.

The program loads C1 at 3 minutes into the future so you can practice what your routine will be prior to C1 regarding preparing your equipment and your solar glasses etc.. All of the partial phase phenomena announcements will play between C1 and C2, which will span 50 minutes. Refer to the section on Partial Phase Phenomena Education.

Totality is pre-programmed to be 105 seconds so you can hear all of the announcements related to totality.

The time between C3 and C4 is 7 minutes and the demo program ends 1 minute after C4.

NOTE: You can stop and re-start the demo session because the app continually considers the system time and will always start the demo again with C1 at 3 minutes after the button is tapped. The contact times will update.

NOTE: The contact times in the demo program are adjustable using the "Adjust" buttons and the audible announcements will play accordingly. For instance you can program any totality duration. You can compress the time between C1 and C2 further. Partial phase announcements are played in their programmed sequence based on the C2 time. Those that do not have time to play are ignored. IF YOU MAKE ADJUSTMENTS, THE ONLY CONDITION IS THAT THE NEW TIMES BE IN THE FUTURE RELATIVE TO THE CURRENT SYSTEM TIME. If you make a mistake, tap the STOP button, and start again.

NOTE: The "Load Demo Contact Times" button has an important feature that you must be aware of, it has a "STOP" button in the top Navigation Bar on the right side of the screen. This "STOP" button will remove any pending app system notifications. If you are ever doing any timer testing for an eclipse and notifications are loaded in the background, these notifications will play even with the app closed if you do not use the "STOP" button first. If your device ever plays a notification when you have the app closed, you should open the app, load the first demo program and tap the "STOP" button. That will remove the remaining notifications.

The "STOP" button availability was limited to the demo program screens and not available on the timer screen on purpose. This prevents accidental removal of system notifications on eclipse day. Therefore, it is a two step process to remove system notifications.

Playing A Practice Eclipse Movie
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Accessed by a button located on the Settings screen, this is an exciting new feature that is possible due to the advanced computing power of the new devices.

This feature loads a practice eclipse movie that is centered around a 120 second totality.

After the "Play A Practice Eclipse Movie" button is tapped, a 270 second movie of a totality begins at a point 90 seconds before C2 along with Solar Eclipse TimerTM doing its routine countdowns. Totality spans 120 seconds in this practice movie. The movie ends 60 seconds after C3 and the practice session closes.

This allows you to practice your photography and observation routine for just prior to totality and during totality over and over again. Because the movie is playing you are practicing with the excitement of a total solar eclipse in progress. It makes your preparation as realistic as possible.

The STOP button (top navigation bar, right side) will stop the movie. You can stop and re-start the movie as many times as you need to because the app continually considers the system time and will start the movie again 90 seconds before C2. The contact times will update.

Ignore the C1 and C4 times, they are loaded with zeros for the function of the practice session and are not used.

You can mute the movie sound by going to the Settings screen, tapping Mute Movie Sound and checking your selection to Off.

NOTE: The totality movie used for this demo session is an edited version of the movie that I took on a cruise ship on the Mediterranean Sea on March 29, 2006. The image has to be re-centered because of the motion of the cruise ship.

NOTE: The person heard making the announcements regarding the progression of the eclipse during the movie is David Levy. David Levy is famous for discovering comets and you may be familiar with comets referred to as Shoemaker-Levy. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 was the comet that broke apart in July of 1992 and collided with Jupiter in July of 1994.

Using the Partial Phase Image Sequence Calculator
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Accessed by a button located on the Settings screen, this is an extremely exciting new feature! I am especially enthusiastic about this feature!

For my first two total solar eclipses, I did the calculations to plan my partial phase images sequence manually. During total solar eclipses the duration of time from C1 to C2 is almost never going to be the same as the duration of time from C3 to C4. Therefore, to plan a sequence of 10 equally distributed partial phase images before and after totality you must calculate the clock times for the photography twice. This is truly a pain!

Luckily for you, the Solar Eclipse TimerTM partial phase image sequence calculator does all of the work for you, based on any 4 contact times you load! It lists the times for you in your local time zone or will do it for universal time! All you have to do is write down the times and take the image at those clock times!

I believe this feature will be a tremendous help for first time eclipse photographers and I am thrilled to provide it.

This feature automatically calculates the clock times required to take 10 equally spaced partial phase images before totality and then 10 equally spaced partial phase images after totality. It re-calculates automatically if the contact times change. This will help you reproduce the beautiful sequence of eclipse pictures you see published by experienced eclipse chasers and professional photographers. Now, you can do it with ease! Just write down the clock times and snap the pictures!

Understand that it is perfectly fine (and exciting) to take an image of the Sun at exact 1st contact time, the exact start of the eclipse. But you will only see a round Sun disk. You have to wait a short time to actually see the Moon take a "bite" out of the Sun's disk. The partial phase image sequence calculator lists its first image time 2 minutes after C1 for this reason. Then there are 10 times listed to take partial phase images. The last time listed, just before totality, is 2 minutes before C2 when you will take your final crescent image and then re-set your camera exposures and prepare for 2nd contact photography.

Then enjoy the beauty of TOTALITY!

After 3rd contact you will replace your solar filter and re-set your camera exposure for the partial phases again. The partial phase image sequence calculator lists the first image time 2 minutes after C3 so you can capture a matching crescent image after totality. Then there are 10 times listed to take partial phase images. The last time listed, just before the end of the eclipse, is 2 minutes before C4 when you will take your final Sun disk image showing the last "bite" of the Moon out of the Sun. Then it is fine to take your last image of the Sun disk exactly at the C4 time to document the official end of the eclipse.

The wonderful thing about this feature is the ability to instantly calculate a list of clock times for any observing location if you are pre-planning a few observing sites. Also, if you need to make location changes due to weather conditions you can instantly re-calculate the times.

NOTE: Go to www.solareclipsetimer.com to print a Partial Phase Image Sequence Calculator form to record yur times for eclipse day.

NOTE: Remember there is one more exciting thing you can try to do one day or two days after a total solar eclipse. Get your camera equipment out and set up where you have an unobstructed view of a low Western horizon. Try to take a picture of the 1 day or the 2 day crescent Moon and realize that the day or two before that Moon was perfectly in line with the Sun creating the eclipse that gave you a "show of a lifetime!"

Path Of Totality Screen
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Solar Eclipse TimerTM is NOT specifically a mapping program. You are responsible for placing yourself in the path of totality. You should also plan for poor weather conditions and consider alternate observing sites.

This screen provides three hyperlinks to internet based interactive eclipse path maps. These maps can help guide you to the path of totality. Once you are in the path use the geolocation functions in Solar Eclipse TimerTM to confirm your coordinates and calculate and load your contact times. Using these links requires a cellular connection, data usage and relying on an active internet connection. These maps are not running locally on the device.

Partial Phase Phenomena Education
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Partial Phase Phenomena warnings occur between 1st Contact and 2nd Contact. These announcements are only relevant for total solar eclipse, or extremely deep annular eclipses. The audible voice warnings that are played are timed backward from the programmed 2nd Contact time. You only have to worry about programming the correct 2nd Contact time; the app will do the calculations for the Partial Phase Phenomena announcments. The warnings remind you to observe ambient temperature, ambient lighting, animal behavior and shadow bands.

The audible voice warnings for the Partial Phase Phenomena are as follows:

“Forty Five Minutes Until Totality, Observe Changes In Ambient Temperature”

“Thirty Minutes Until Totality, Observe Changes In Ambient Temperature”

“Fifteen Minutes Until Totality, Observe Changes In Ambient Temperature”

“Ten Minutes Until Totality, Observe Changes In Ambient Lighting”

“Eight Minutes Until Totality, Observe Changes In Animal Behavior”

“Three Minutes Until Totality, Observe For Shadow Bands”

The audible voice warnings that were chosen for the Partial Phase Phenomena were given a great deal of thought. Not all veteran eclipse chasers would agree on when and what was chosen to warn about, so let me explain a little about my selections.

Although much is written about the decrease in ambient temperature during a total eclipse of the Sun, the emphasis is usually placed on the time of totality. But in reality the temperature is slowly and steadily dropping during the partial phases. Depending on your observing location, the season, the outdoor temperature, relative humidity and wind conditions, it is possible to perceive the change in ambient temperature well in advance of totality. In Africa, in June of 2001, I was amazed to clearly feel the drop in temperature at 30 minutes before totality. My perception was confirmed by temperature data collected during that eclipse. Therefore, for Solar Eclipse TimerTM, I chose to alert you to observe for your perception of ambient temperature changes at 45, 30 and 15 minutes before totality.

By 10 minutes before totality, there is a distinct difference in the ambient lighting and I chose to put an alert about this phenomena at this time. Much is written about this and the most basic observation is that is it getting darker. However, it is a very interesting and unusual decrease in light. The following are my perceptions of the change in lighting and it is difficult to describe. The overall brightness is decreasing even though the Sun is high in the sky. But the change in brightness is not the same as when, for instance, a thick cloud passes in front of the Sun on a regular day. There is a subtle color change, which to me appeared to be slightly gray, or silvery gray. Similar to wearing a pair of very lightly tinted sunglasses with gray lenses or looking through a lightly tinted neutral density camera filter. But because the effect is all around you and you are not wearing sunglasses the scene has an eerie feeling. The reason you do not start to perceive the change in brightness until this point is that the brightness has been slowly decreasing but you iris has slowly been enlarging to allow more light in. But then there is finally a point where your iris cannot open any larger and you start to see the ambient light looking dimmer.

The color change is thought to be due to a combination of things. One is that the color of the light coming from the edges of the Sun (the crescents) might be a slightly different color than that from the full surface Sun. The second has to do with the light receptors in your eye, cones and rods. With bright light, the cones which allow you to see color are functioning properly. But within 3 to 7 minutes before totality the light is dimming and now the rods are starting to work. And since those are more sensitive, but don't see color the surroundings take on that gray look perhaps with less color saturation.

Another phenomena at approximately 10 minutes before totality is the change in the appearance of shadows cast to the ground. The shadows cast in certain directions tend to have a sharper edge to them. Very little is written about this and I cannot say that in Africa I perceived the changes. On a normal day, the lighting from a full Sun disk is not a point source, light comes from all across it's surface. produces shadows that have fuzzy indistinct edges. During the final 10 to 20 minutes before a total eclipse, when the Sun is a thin crescent, two types of shadows can be cast. Shadows that are in line with the crescent of the Sun, are sharper at the edges that are in the axis of the crescent, but fuzzy that the upper or lower end-points of the shadow, because these allow a broader point source of light.

At 8 minutes before totality, I chose to alert you to observe for changes in animal behavior. This close to totality, it is becoming dark enough that animals can be fooled into thinking it is becoming nighttime and they will behave as such. There have been reports of bats beginning to fly, birds going to their perches to rest or sleep, grazing animals ceasing to feed, insects like crickets beginning to make their nighttime sounds and bees may stop flying. In Africa in June of 2001, the increase in the number and volume of chirping crickets in the field surrounding us was clearly evident!

At 3 minutes before totality there is a warning to observe for shadowbands and what is meant is to “start” to look for shadowbands. They are faint “bands of shadows” or undulations of light that can be see on the ground. Some describe the appearance as similar to the way sunlight moves across the bottom of a swimming pool, but with a direction to the motion. We saw them in Africa in 2002 and I would describe them as complex continuous parallel serpentine shadows that move in a snake-like motion away from you and sideways. Shadowbands are caused by the sunlight rays from the thin crescent of the Sun being bent as the light passes through warmer and cooler cells of air in the atmosphere in the region of the umbra. They move along with the umbra. The phenomena will probably occur closer to totality when the crescent is even thinner. However, I wanted to give ample warning to begin to look for them because every eclipse is unique and everyone’s observing location is different. There is another reminder after the 2nd Contact In 60 Seconds announcement.

At 30 seconds after 3rd contact there, is another announcement to look for shadow bands because this thin crescent gives the second opportunity for this spectacular phenomenon to occur.

About Screen
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The Information icon in the Navigation Bar on the top right hand corner of the app brings you to the About screen. Here you will find hyperlinks to the Solar Eclipse TimerTM website.

The Solar Eclipse TimerTM website at www.solareclipsetimer.com has additional helpful and educational information about using the app, solar eclipses in general and solar eclipse photography.

There is also a hyperlink that will connect you to the webpage that has more information about our apps and links to the Google Play Store and the Apple Store. All of our apps are related to helping you and your family enjoy a total solar eclipse. Please check out the individual apps.

I have authored and developed solar eclipse quiz game called Eclipse USA Quiz Game. This is a fun and educational app that will help you become the eclipse expert in your group. The first two quizzes in the game are a free download and include a quizzes called Eclipse Fun Quiz 1 and USA 2017 Eclipse Quiz. If you want to increase your knowledge, there is a in app purchase for a more challenging quiz called Eclipse Pro Quiz 2. There is also an option for purchasing the first three quizzes combined together in a quiz called Totality. Finally, there is an option to purchase any of 12 custom quizzes authored specifically for the states that are in the path of totality. These custom state quizzes have all of the questions included in the Totality Quiz plus 20 trivia questions about the individual custom state quiz that is purchased.

Support: This app has been developed to be compatible with Android 4.4 (and greater) and iOS 10 (and greater) and has NOT been tested to be backward compatible with previous operating sysytem versions. I have developed this app to be as user friendly and intuitive as possible. It has been extensively tested with the user experience in mind. The Help File is extensive and detailed. However, I will try to respond to questions at the email address: foxwoodastronomy@gmail.com

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TERMS OF USE

By downloading, installing and/or using (and continuing to use) the Solar Eclipse TimerTM app, you agree fully to the following Terms of Use:

General

The Solar Eclipse TimerTM app (the “App”) is not a mapping program. You are responsible for placing yourself in the path of totality. Foxwood Astronomy, LLC (“Foxwood Astronomy”) does not assume any liability for and shall not be liable for missed eclipse events due to reliance on the App.

The App is a guide to the events of a total solar eclipse. The accuracy of the contact times are subject to user set-up and input. You must use proper eye protection during the partial phases a total solar eclipse. The 2nd and 3rd contact time warnings are a guide to the beginning and ending of totality. You must not look at the event with your unprotected eyes. Foxwood Astronomy does not assume any liability for eye injury during an eclipse.

All of the detailed calculations performed in the App have been tested extensively and are believed to be as accurate as possible at the time of the release of the App. Eclipse contact time mathematical formulas are part of the public domain and those formulas serve as the basis for the App. Other sections of the code in the App are unique and proprietary.

The geolocation functions have been tested extensively but is ultimately reliant on the performance of your device at any particular location and at any particular time. Foxwood Astronomy does not assume any liability for inability to locate latitude and longitude coordinates. Geolocation systems in smart phones and cellular enabled tablets use a number of complex methods to find your location in addition to using GPS satellites. It is a mixture of Wi-Fi, Assisted GPS, Digital Compass and Cellular information. Depending on your location some methods will require the use of cellular service and a small amount of data may be used. Tablets that are Wi-Fi only will have difficulty geolocating in remote areas because they do not have access to cellular information and do not have GPS capability. If you are planning to observe an eclipse in a very remote location where there may not be cellular service you should have a dedicated hand held GPS receiver to obtain your GPS coordinates. Another option is to obtain GPS coordinates from your vehicle if it is equipped with navigation.

Most of the functions of the App run locally on the device, however, in some situations, the cellular geolocation capabilities will use a small amount of data. You are responsible for your contract with a cellular carrier, data service access and data usage charges. Inability to connect to the internet (due to lack of connection or otherwise) may negatively impact App performance.

Foxwood Astronomy reserves the right to update and change the App without notification to end users.

Software Rights and Use Rights

The present version of the App has been developed to be compatible with iOS 10 (or greater) and Android 4.4 (or greater) and has NOT been tested to be backward compatible with previous operating system versions. Foxwood Astronomy is not responsible or liable for device/equipment issues that may arise from installing the App.

This software is the property of Foxwood Astronomy. All of the images, composite images, video, banner, logo, descriptions, design features, unique functional features, audible announcements, domain names and other intellectual property contained in the App is owned by Foxwood Astronomy and may not be reproduced by end users. The software in the App has some sections that contain proprietary code and cannot be copied or reverse engineered. The App is protected by the copyright laws of the United States, international copyright laws and by any other treaties and conventions protecting intellectual property.

You agree that you will not, nor will you attempt to have any others copy the code, modify the code, reverse engineer the code, modify the App or reproduce the basic concepts of the App as a derivative under another name.

The purchase of the App gives the user the right to use the App for personal and non-commercial use. Some special situations are outlined:

A. Foxwood Astronomy grants the right to use the App with its announcements amplified for small private total solar eclipse observing groups. In such a case proper credit to the App and Foxwood Astronomy should be given.

B. Foxwood Astronomy grants the right to use the App with its announcements amplified for NASA sponsored total solar eclipse observing groups. In such a case proper credit to the App and Foxwood Astronomy should be given.

C. Foxwood Astronomy grants the right for the guiding astronomer/scientist of commercial travel agency eclipse tour group to use his/her personal copy to help him/her make announcements about the important eclipse events. In such a case proper credit to the App and Foxwood Astronomy should be given.

D. Foxwood Astronomy does not grant the right for commercial travel agency eclipse tour groups to amplify the announcements in the App to the group.

E. Foxwood Astronomy does not grant the right for the announcements to be broadcast over the airways or the internet in any form.

Warranty

The App and all materials and content are provided “as is” without any express or implied warranty of any kind including warranties of merchantability, non-infringement of intellectual property or fitness for any particular purpose. Although accurate it should not be considered a scientific grade software product for any particular event, scientific or otherwise. In no event will Foxwood Astronomy or its owners, affiliates, employees, officers, directors, agents or contractors be liable for any damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of profits, business interruption or loss of opportunity) arising out of the use of or inability to use the content and/or materials on the App, even if Foxwood Astronomy has been advised of the possibility of such damages. Without limiting the foregoing, in no case shall the entire liability of Foxwood Astronomy, whether in contract, warranty, tort (including negligence, whether active, passive or imputed), product liability, strict liability or other theory, arising out of or relating to the use of or inability to use the App or Foxwood Astronomy products and services exceed any compensation you pay, if any, to Foxwood Astronomy for access to or use of the App, or exceed the purchase price for Foxwood Astronomy products and services.

The information on the App is intended solely for entertainment purposes and may not be used as a substitute for professional scientific advice and/or information, as circumstances will vary by location.

Jurisdiction

The laws of the State of Alabama, excluding its choice of law provisions, will govern these terms and conditions and any dispute that arises between you and Foxwood Astronomy. All disputes related to these terms and conditions or the App will be brought solely in the federal or state courts located in Morgan County, Alabama, and by your continued use of the App you consent to personal jurisdiction and waive any objection as to inconvenient forum or otherwise which you may have to such courts.